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SUNUP TV 
141 Agriculture North
Oklahoma State University
Stillwater, OK 74078

Phone: (405) 744-4065
FAX: (405) 744-5738
E-mail: sunup@okstate.edu

 

 

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Transcript for April 27, 2013

Transcript for April 27, 2013

THIS WEEK’S SEGMENTS: 

  • WHEAT TO COTTON
  • CROP INSURANCE
  • COW-CALF CORNER
  • MARKET MONITOR
  • MESONET WEATHER
  • DRY LOT CATTLE
  • SHOP STOP
  • AG TECH CLASS

 

WHEAT TO COTTON

  >> HELLO EVERYONE AND WELCOME TO SUNUP, I'M LYNDALL STOUT.

THIS PAST WEEK, SOME PARTS OF OKLAHOMA SAW THE FOURTH LATE FREEZE OF THE SEASON, AND WE'RE JUST NOW GETTING AN IDEA OF THE DAMAGE FROM THE EARLIEST EVENT.

>> AS WE GO BACK HERE THE LAST MONTH AND A HALF, I HAD SOME HOPE THAT ONCE WE STARTED GETTING SOME MOISTURE THINGS WERE GOING TO LOOK BETTER FOR US WHEAT PRODUCERS OUT THERE.

RIGHT NOW THE BIG WORD THAT PRODUCERS ARE CONCERNED ABOUT IS FREEZE, FREEZE, AND MORE FREEZE.

>> WE'VE ACTUALLY HAD FOUR FREEZE EVENTS ON THIS CROP.

THERE IS SOME DAMAGE FROM THAT LAST FREEZE, BUT SIGNIFICANT DAMAGE FROM THE FIRST FREEZE THAT'S REALLY SHOWING UP NOW.

>> ROGER FISHER HAS BEEN FARMING AND RANCHING IN TILLMAN COUNTY FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS, AND HE IS USED TO CHALLENGES, BUT THIS YEAR THEY SEEM TO BE PILING UP.

>> THE FREEZE ON TOP OF THE EXTREMELY DRY CONDITIONS ALL WINTER -- THE CROP WAS IN A WEAKENED STATE, AND IT WAS STILL VERY DORMANT, IN THE MIDDLE OF MARCH WHERE WE'RE STARTING TO BREAK DORMANCY, THIS CROP WAS STILL FAIRLY DORMANT BECAUSE OF THE LACK OF MOISTURE, AND THEN THE FREEZE CAME ON TOP OF IT AND REALLY SIGNIFICANTLY IMPACTED THE ABILITY FOR THAT WHEAT TO MAKE A CROP.

>> TILLMAN COUNTY EXTENSION EDUCATOR AARON HENSON GAVE ME A TOUR OF THE VARIETY OF DAMAGE SEEN ACROSS THE AREA'S WHEAT CROP.

>> SOME OF THE DAMAGE, SOME OF THE EASY, VISIBLE DAMAGE IS HEADS LIKE THIS, AND YOU'LL SEE THE TOP, OH, YOU'LL LOOK AT THE TOP HALF OF THIS HEAD IS WHITE IN COLOR AND IS DAMAGED FROM THE FREEZE DAMAGE.

THERE'S OTHER ONES LIKE THIS HERE, AND THIS PLANT HERE -- AND I'LL PULL THIS BACK WHERE YOU CAN SEE IT, BUT THIS PLANT HERE IS ACTUALLY IN THE SAME STAGE, BUT IT ACTUALLY GOT AFFECTED WORSE.

THIS IS THE FLAGLEAF THAT'S DEAD, AND IT HAS BEEN DEAD FOR SEVERAL DAYS NOW.

HERE'S ANOTHER GOOD EXAMPLE.

THIS IS -- YOU SEE THE HEAD, FOR THE MOST PART, IS GOOD, BUT THE AWNS, THE AWNS IS WHERE THE ENERGY COMES DOWN INTO THE ACTUAL HEAD.

WHEN YOU HAVE AWN DAMAGE YOU'LL ACTUALLY HAVE SOME GRAIN DAMAGE ALSO BECAUSE THIS IS WHERE ALL THE NUTRIENTS GOES TO, DOWN INTO THE HEAD.

SO THAT'S A PRETTY GOOD PICTURE OF THE AWNS DAMAGE.

>> THAT IS JUST A SAMPLE FROM STANDING IN ONE SPOT.

>> EVERY FIELD'S DIFFERENT.

WE COULD WALK 20 FEET FROM HERE, AND I COULD GIVE YOU MY HONEST BEST GUESS OF WHAT THIS DAMAGE IS STANDING WHERE WE ARE.

WE CAN GO 20 FEET FROM HERE, AND THAT ESTIMATE WILL BE DIFFERENT.

>> SO A CHALLENGE FOR PRODUCERS TO BE PATIENT:  WAIT FOR THE PICTURE OF DAMAGE TO FULLY FORM, THEN GET INSURANCE ADJUSTORS INTO THE FIELD.

BUT PATIENCE WITH WHEAT IS HARD TO HAVE IN AN AREA OF OKLAHOMA BETTER KNOWN FOR COTTON.

>> EVERYTHING IN COTTON IS ABOUT MANAGING FOR EARLINESS.

>> I SPOKE WITH RANDY BOWMAN FROM OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY'S SOUTHWEST RESEARCH AND EXTENSION CENTER NEAR ALTUS.

>> ANY TIME THAT WE LOOK AT TRYING TO GROW NON-IRRIGATED COTTON FOLLOWING A FAILED NON-IRRIGATED WHEAT CROP, THERE ARE A LOT OF ISSUES THAT COME INTO PLAY THERE.

THE ONLY THING THAT I CAN SUGGEST IS THAT PRODUCERS REALLY NEED TO BE ON POINT WITH THIS PARTICULAR SITUATION AND VISIT WITH THEIR CROP INSURANCE AGENTS, BECAUSE, BASED ON WHAT I'VE BEEN TOLD BY VARIOUS INSURANCE AGENTS, IT'S GOING TO BE A HIGHLY INDIVIDUAL SITUATION.

THERE ARE A LOT OF THINGS THAT COME INTO PLAY, BUT IT'S PROBABLY NOT INSURMOUNTABLE IF GUYS WANT TO TRY TO GET A COTTON CROP ESTABLISHED.

THERE'S A LOT OF POTENTIAL THERE FOR GUYS TO MAKE IMPROVEMENTS IN THEIR SOIL QUALITY OVERALL, THAT CAN HELP BREAK THE WHEAT WEED AND DISEASE CYCLE, PERHAPS, THROUGH THE ROTATION, AND WE HAVE A LOT OF GOOD VARIETIES AND TRANSGENIC TRAIT TECHNOLOGIES THAT CAN HELP THAT ALONG.

>> YOU CAN LEARN MORE ABOUT THOSE VARIETIES AND HEAR MORE OF MY CONVERSATIONS AT SUNUP.OKSTATE.EDU.

MEANWHILE, ROGER FISHER REMINDS US THAT THIS ISN'T THE FIRST CHALLENGE OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURE HAS FACED.

>> WE'RE ACCUSTOMED TO THESE KIND OF EXTREMES IN THIS PART OF THE STATE.

THIS IS OUR HISTORY, AND WE LEARN TO MANAGE WITH IT, AND IT'LL BE OKAY.

 

CROP INSURANCE

>> FOR MORE ON THE CROP INSURANCE PICTURE, WE TURN TO OUR AG POLICY SPECIALIST JODY CAMPICHE FOR GUIDANCE.

>> CALL THE CROP INSURANCE AGENT, TALK TO THEM, HAVE AN ADJUSTOR COME OUT BEFORE THEY DO ANYTHING, BEFORE THEY DECIDE TO GRAZE IT OR HAY IT OR WHATEVER THEIR DECISION IS GOING TO BE.

THAT'S THE BEST CHOICE.

AND ONE THING THAT'S PROBABLY GOING TO HAPPEN ACROSS THE STATE IS THERE'S LIKELY GOING TO BE A LOT OF CLAIMS.

SO IF THEY THINK THEY MAY WANT TO FILE A CLAIM, THEY MAY WANT TO CALL THEIR AGENT AND GET ON THE LIST, BECAUSE THERE MAY BE A BIT OF A BACKLOG OF PEOPLE WAITING ON ADJUSTORS TO COME OUT.

>> AND TAKING THAT ADVICE, WE HEADED TO PIEDMONT TO SEE CROP INSURANCE AGENT BAMBI SIDWELL.

>> TYPICALLY THE ADJUSTORS ARE WAITING SEVEN TO TEN DAYS AFTER THE LATEST FREEZE SO THE MOST DAMAGE CAN BE PREVALENT WHEN THEY COME OUT TO ASSESS THE DAMAGE.

>> ONCE YOU'RE ON THE LIST, YOU KNOW THAT YOUR ADJUSTOR IS GOING TO COME OUT, TAKE A LOOK, WHAT DOES A PRODUCER NEED TO DO IN THE MEANTIME?

>> THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS THAT THE PRODUCER DOES NOT GO IN AND DESTROY THAT CROP, DOESN'T PUT CATTLE OUR ON IT OR DO ANYTHING PRIOR TO THE ADJUSTOR'S APPROVAL.

THE ADJUSTORS ARE GOING TO COME OUT THERE, RIGHT NOW THE WHEAT LOOKS PRETTY GREEN, NOT QUITE TO THE HEADING STAGE YET.

THEY'RE STILL GOING TO BE COUNTING THE GREEN TILLERS.

IT'S GOING TO BE REALLY HARD TO GIVE A FULL ADJUSTMENT UNTIL IT COMES OUT TO THE HEADING STAGE.

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS THAT THE FARMER DOES NOT DESTROY THAT CROP BEFORE IT IS RELEASED BY THE ADJUSTOR.

>> SO THE AGENT AND ADJUSTOR GETS AN ACCURATE PICTURE?

>> AS FAR AS A LOSS GOES, IF THE FARMER DOES HAVE FREEZE DAMAGE AND COMES OUT AND DESTROYS THAT CROP, WE WON'T BE ABLE TO APPRAISE WHAT KIND OF DAMAGE HE HAD BECAUSE THE CROP IS DESTROYED.

A LOT OF TIMES RIGHT NOW, YOU KNOW, IF A FARMER KNOWS HE HAS DAMAGE, BECAUSE HE'S CUT OPEN THE STEM AND HE'S DETERMINED THAT HE HAS DAMAGE, MAYBE WE CAN'T ADJUST IT OUT YET.

WITH AN ADJUSTOR'S APPROVAL, A FARMER CAN LEAVE STRIPS IN THE FIELD IF THEY WANT TO GO AHEAD AND SWATH IT AND PUT CATTLE ON IT, WHATEVER, BUT IT IS IMPORTANT THAT THEY HAVE A SIGN-OFF FROM THE ADJUSTOR.

BUT WHAT THE ADJUSTOR IS LOOKING FOR RIGHT NOW, WE ARE NOT TO THE HEADING STAGE, SO THEY'RE GOING TO BE LOOKING AT GREEN TILLERS, AND THEY HAVE TO COUNT THOSE GREEN TILLERS.

BUT ONCE THE STATE BECOMES FULLY HEADED OUT, THEY WILL BE ABLE TO THEN COUNT THE HEADS.

OF COURSE, THE WHITE HEADS ARE NOT GOING TO FEEL THOSE HAVE IMMEDIATE FREEZE DAMAGE.

AT THAT TIME THEY'LL BE ABLE TO GET A MORE ACCURATE APPRAISAL OF WHAT THE CROP'S GOING TO BE.

>> AND THERE ARE SOME LIMITATIONS, TOO, AS TO HOW MUCH YOU GUYS CAN DO?

>> WHAT WE'RE SEEING IN THE STATE RIGHT NOW, IT'S REALLY HARD TO ASSESS HOW MUCH DAMAGE WE REALLY DO HAVE.

MAYBE IF WE DON'T HAVE A FIELD FULL OF DAMAGE, THE PRODUCERS MIGHT END UP GOING AND CUTTING IT ONCE HARVEST GETS HERE, HOWEVER HIS YIELD MIGHT BE LOWER BECAUSE MAYBE ALL THE HEADS DIDN'T FILL, WHICH WE WOULD KNOW THAT ONCE WE DO A BUSHEL COUNT AT HARVEST TIME.

HOWEVER, IF A MAJORITY OF FILL LOOKS FREEZE DAMAGED, THEY WOULD    -- AS LONG AS THEY ACCEPT THE APPRAISAL THEY GET, THEY WOULD BE ABLE TO GO IN AND DESTROY THE CROP AS THEY SEE FIT.

>> SO, BOTTOM LINE, GET ON THE WAITING LIST, AND DON'T DO ANYTHING.

>> ABSOLUTELY.

UNTIL THEY SPEAK WITH AN ADJUSTOR AND SIGN THAT LOSS PAPERWORK, IT'S VERY IMPORTANT THAT THEY DON'T DESTROY THAT CROP, BECAUSE IT WILL -- NOT VOID THE INSURANCE, BUT THERE WOULDN'T BE AN APPRAISAL FOR THE FARMER OR PRODUCER TO BE PAID ON THE DAMAGE.

>> WHEAT QUALITY AND PRICES ARE ALSO AT PLAY WITH FEDERAL PROGRAMS, WHICH HAVE AN UPCOMING DEADLINE.

>> PRODUCERS WILL NEED TO DECIDE IF THEY WANT TO ENROLL IN THE DIRECT AND COUNTER-CYCLICAL PAYMENT PROGRAM OR THE ACRE PROGRAM BY JUNE 1ST.

 THE WAY IT'S LOOKING RIGHT NOW, IF THE STATE WHEAT YIELDS ARE LOW AND SOME OF THE PRELIMINARY ESTIMATES ARE LOOKING LIKE WHEAT MAY BE DAMAGED IN LARGE PARTS OF THE STATE, SO IF THE STATE YIELD IS LOW, PRODUCERS MAY WANT TO ENROLL IN ACRE.

I'LL BE HAVING SOME ACRE ESTIMATES OUT IN THE NEXT TWO OR THREE WEEKS.

THE FIRST PRELIMINARY YIELD ESTIMATE COMES OUT MAY 10TH, SO I'LL KNOW A LITTLE BIT MORE THEN ON WHAT THE 2013 ACRE PAYMENT IS GOING TO LOOK LIKE AND IF IT LOOKS LIKE PRODUCERS MAY WANT TO ENROLL IN IT.

 

COW-CALF CORNER

>> GETTING THE HIGHEST PERCENTAGE OF COWS RE-BRED DURING THE UPCOMING BREEDING SEASON, OF COURSE, IS AN IMPORTANT GOAL FOR ANY COW-CALF OPERATION.

IF YOU'VE GOT SOME COWS THIS SPRING THAT ARE JUST A LITTLE BIT MARGINAL IN BODY CONDITION, AND YOU'RE CONCERNED ABOUT WHETHER THEY'RE GOING TO RETURN TO HEAT CYCLES AND GET RE-BRED IN THE UPCOMING BREEDING SEASON, THERE'S A MANAGEMENT TOOL THAT YOU MIGHT TRY THAT WILL HELP IMPROVE THAT RE-BREEDING PERCENTAGE ON SOME OF THESE MARGINAL COWS JUST A LITTLE BIT.

THE TOOL I'M TALKING ABOUT IS SHORT-TERM CALF REMOVAL.

WHAT DO I MEAN BY THAT?

SHORT-TERM CALF REMOVAL IS JUST THIS BUSINESS OF PHYSICALLY REMOVING -- SORTING THE CALVES INTO ANOTHER PASTURE OR ANOTHER TRAP AWAY FROM THE COWS FOR 48 HOURS, JUST MERELY MAKING SURE THEY'RE ON A DIFFERENT SIDE OF THE FENCE FOR THAT TIME FRAME.

WHAT WE'RE DOING IS TRICKING MOTHER NATURE, FOR THAT 48 HOURS, INTO MAYBE HAVING HER THINK THAT THAT CALF HAS BEEN WEANED, AND A FEW OF THOSE COWS WILL START TO TURN LOOSE OF THE HORMONES THAT ALLOW THEM TO RECYCLE AND RE-BREED.

IF YOU LOOK AT SOME DATA THAT COMES FROM KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY ABOUT 30 YEARS AGO, IT'S A GOOD IDEA OF WHAT ALL THE RESEARCH DATA HAS BEEN DONE, AND SEVERAL UNIVERSITIES HAVE SHOWN, AND THAT IS THAT, IN THIS PARTICULAR CASE, THERE WAS A 6% INCREASE IN THE PERCENTAGE OF THOSE COWS THAT WERE RE-BRED IN THE UPCOMING BREEDING SEASON BY HAVING SHORT-TERM CALF REMOVAL PERFORMED ON THEM.

NOW, YOU MIGHT BE CONCERNED ABOUT THE CALVES DURING THIS 48 HOURS.

FIRST OF ALL, WE WANT TO MAKE SURE THERE'S PLENTY OF WATER AVAILABLE FOR THOSE CALVES, AND SOME PRODUCERS WILL PUT OUT A LITTLE SWEET FEED, HAVE THAT AVAILABLE IN SOME PANS OR LOW BUNKS FOR THE CALVES TO REACH.

QUITE FRANKLY, THEY PROBABLY WON'T EAT VERY MUCH, BUT HAVING SOMETHING THERE TO PERHAPS MAKE THEM A LITTLE MORE CALM, LESS RESTLESS, WOULD BE HELPFUL.

48 HOURS IS THE OPTIMUM TIME FRAME.

24 HOURS LOOKS TO BE TOO SHORT, DOESN'T HAVE AS MUCH IMPACT.

WE'VE LOOKED AT AS FAR AS 96 HOURS' REMOVAL HERE AT OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY, AND THAT DIDN'T GIVE US ANY ADVANTAGE OVER 48.

SO I THINK WE WANT TO STICK WITH THAT.

I WANT TO REMIND YOU:  48-HOUR CALF REMOVAL IS SOMETHING THAT'S NOT POWERFUL ENOUGH TO INCREASE THE BREEDING PERCENTAGE ON REAL THIN COWS, AND IF COWS ARE ALREADY IN GOOD BODY CONDITION, IT WON'T HAVE MUCH IMPACT AT ALL, SO IT'S FOR THOSE MARGINAL COWS THAT THE 48-HOUR CALF SEPARATION HAS SOME REAL ADVANTAGES.

IF YOU HAVE SOME COWS IN THAT SITUATION, YOU MIGHT TRY THAT THIS SPRING GOING INTO THE UPCOMING BREEDING SEASON AND SEE IF YOU CAN INCREASE THE RE-BREEDING PERCENTAGE ON SOME OF THE COWS IN YOUR HERD.

HEY, WE LOOK FORWARD TO VISITING WITH YOU AGAIN NEXT WEEK ON SUNUP'S COW-CALF CORNER.

MARKET MONITOR

>> KIM ANDERSON, OUR GRAIN MARKETING SPECIALIST, JOINS US NOW.

WE'VE BEEN TALKING ABOUT FREEZE DAMAGE IN WHEAT THIS WEEK.

WHAT'S THE WORD ON THE STREET IN TERMS OF PRODUCTION?

>> IF YOU LOOK AT PAST PRODUCTION, A FIVE-YEAR AVERAGE FOR THE UNITED STATES IS 951 MILLION BUSHELS.

FOR OKLAHOMA, IT'S 118 MILLION BUSHELS.

LAST YEAR THE HARD RED WINTER WHEAT CROP WAS JUST SLIGHTLY OVER A BILLION BUSHELS, AND IN OKLAHOMA IT WAS 155 MILLION.

IF YOU LOOK AT 2011, THE DROUGHT-STRICKEN YEAR, IT WAS 780 MILLION BUSHELS OF HARD RED WINTER WHEAT IN THE U.S. AND ONLY 70 IN OKLAHOMA.

THE AVERAGE BUSHELS PER ACRE FOR OKLAHOMA IS 30 BUSHELS.

>> WHAT'S THE PREDICTION THEN FOR THIS YEAR?

>> WELL, GETTING INFORMATION FROM ANALYSTS ON PREDICTIONS, ESPECIALLY WITH THE RECENT FREEZES AND THE DROUGHT GOING ON IS LIKE PULLING TEETH, BUT I THINK FOR OKLAHOMA, PROBABLY SOMEWHERE AROUND 100 MILLION, 105 MILLION BUSHELS FOR THE UNITED STATES, PROBABLY SOMEWHERE AROUND 900 MILLION.

>> AND FOR THE UPCOMING CROP, I UNDERSTAND WE HAD AN INCREASE IN PLANTED ACRES?

>> YES, THAT'S ONE OF THE REASONS WE CAN MAYBE BID THAT HUNDRED MILLION BUSHELS.

IF YOU LOOK BACK AT 2011, WE PLANTED 5.1 MILLION ACRES, THIS YEAR WE PLANTED 5.5 MILLION ACRES.

SO THAT'S 400,000 ACRES.

WE CAN HAVE A LITTLE LOWER YIELDS AND STILL HAVE HIGHER PRODUCTION RELATIVE TO OTHER YEARS.

>> LET'S TALK ABOUT PRICES.

HAVE YOU SEEN AN IMPACT ON PRICES BECAUSE OF THE NEWS OF THE FREEZE?

>> AS YOU KNOW, THE PRICES HAVE BEEN WALLOWING AROUND FOR THE LAST MONTH, THEY'VE BEEN PRETTY STABLE.

WHERE WE SEE THE CHANGE IN IS THE CARRY IN THE MARKET.

THAT'S -- SAY, COMPARE THE WHEAT JULY CONTRACT, AROUND $7.45 TO THE DECEMBER, $7.73, THAT'S A 28-CENT WHAT WE CALL "CARRY" THERE, OR SPREAD.

 YOU GO BACK A COUPLE WEEKS OR MONTH OR SO, THAT WAS AT 35 CENTS.

THE MARKET'S TELLING YOU THEY'RE GOING TO WANT YOU TO SELL THAT WHEAT AT HARVEST, THEY'RE GOING TO NEED IT AT HARVEST, AND PROBABLY MORE AT HARVEST THAN THEY WILL IN DECEMBER.

IF YOU LOOK AT CORN, IT'S $6.23 ON THE JULY AND $5.29 ON THE DECEMBER, WHICH, AGAIN, THEY'RE SAYING WE'VE GOT SHORT CORN RIGHT NOW, BUT WE EXPECT TO HAVE A LOT OF CORN IN DECEMBER.

>> WHAT'S THE MARKET THEN OFFERING FOR HARVEST DELIVERY WHEAT?

>> MOST ELEVATORS IN OKLAHOMA FOR HARVEST DELIVERED ARE OFFERING BETWEEN A MINUS 39 AND A MINUS 50 CENTS, RIGHT AT $7 FOR A HARVEST-FORWARD CONTRACT.

>> KIM ANDERSON, THANKS A LOT.

WE'LL SEE YOU NEXT WEEK.

 

MESONET WEATHER

>> I'M AL SUTHERLAND WITH YOUR MESONET WEATHER REPORT.

JUST AS FARMERS WERE ASSESSING FREEZE DAMAGE FROM APRIL 18TH AND 19TH, THEY WERE HIT WITH ANOTHER ROUND OF FRIGID WEATHER.

A MAP SHOWING THE LOWS AND FREEZE HOURS FOR TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY OF THIS WEEK HAS SOME BONE-CHILLING NUMBERS ON IT.

BOISE CITY HAD A LOW OF 15 DEGREES AND WAS BELOW FREEZING FOR 32 HOURS OUT OF 48.

WOODWARD HAD A LOW OF 24, WITH 20 HOURS BELOW FREEZING.

A LITTLE FARTHER SOUTH AT WEATHERFORD, THE RECORDED LOW WAS 23 DEGREES, WITH EIGHT HOURS BELOW FREEZING.

THIS LATEST ROUND OF COLD COULD ADD EVEN MORE DAMAGE TO WHEAT AND CANOLA CROPS THAT HAVE ALREADY SUFFERED FROM WINTER DROUGHT AND TWO EARLIER ROUNDS OF FREEZING WEATHER THIS APRIL.

COLDER AIR TEMPERATURES HAVE LED TO COOLER SOIL TEMPERATURES.

A MAP OF THREE-DAY SOIL-TEMPERATURE AVERAGES FROM MID-WEEK AT FOUR INCHES DEEP UNDER BARE SOIL HAS VALUES PREDOMINANTLY IN THE 50s, WHICH IS COOL FOR SPRING-PLANTING CROPS.

A CHART OF WEATHERFORD SOIL TEMPERATURES FOR FOUR INCHES UNDER BARE SOIL SHOWS HOW THE COLD-AIR EVENTS HAVE DRIVEN DOWN THE SOIL TEMPERATURE.

THE GRAPH SHOWS SOIL TEMPERATURES DROPPING BELOW 40 DEGREES THE MORNING OF APRIL 19th AND AGAIN ON APRIL 24th.

HOPEFULLY THAT WAS THE LAST OF THE FREEZING TEMPERATURES, AND SPRING'S WARMTH WILL STAY WITH US FROM NOW ON.

GARY, HOW HAS THE RAIN EASED OUR DROUGHT?

>> GOOD MORNING, EVERYBODY.

CERTAINLY A PLEASURE TO BE BACK ON SUNUP THIS WEEK, AND WE'VE HAD QUITE THE EXCITING WEEK OF WEATHER.

WE'VE HAD TORNADOES, LARGE HAIL, DUST STORMS, FREEZING RAIN, SNOW, LOTS OF FREEZING TEMPERATURES, AND, OF COURSE, LOTS OF HEAVY RAINFALL IN CERTAIN AREAS.

SO WE'RE GOING TO START OUT WITH THE RAINFALL MAP FROM BASICALLY THE LAST SEVEN TO TEN DAYS AND SEE WHAT WE HAVE TO WORK WITH, WITH THE MOST CURRENT DROUGHT-MONITOR MAP.

THIS COVERS THE PAST TEN DAYS FROM THE OKLAHOMA MESONET, AND YOU CAN SEE WE'VE HAD ABOUT THREE TO EIGHT INCHES ALONG A NARROW STRIP ALONG THE I-44 CORRIDOR.

WHEN WE LOOK AT THAT AND TRY TO CONFIGURE THIS WEEK'S DROUGHT-MONITOR MAP, AT LEAST WE SAW THE CHANCE FOR MORE IMPROVEMENTS.

SO LET'S TAKE A LOOK AT THE LATEST MAP, RELEASED ON THURSDAY MORNING.

 WE CAN SEE MORE OF EASTERN OKLAHOMA, EVEN OVER INTO CENTRAL OKLAHOMA, WE HAVE MORE AREAS WITH, YOU KNOW, COMPLETELY DROUGHT-FREE CONDITIONS.

NOW, WE STILL HAVE THOSE AREAS OF D-4 AND D-3 OUT ACROSS WESTERN, SOUTH CENTRAL, AND THE PANHANDLE, AND ALSO UP IN NORTH CENTRAL OKLAHOMA.

WE REALLY NEED FOR RAINFALLS TO START SPREADING TO THE NORTH AND SOUTH AND THEN, OF COURSE, FARTHER OUT TO THE WEST.

LET'S TAKE A LOOK AT THE HOURS-BELOW-FREEZING MAP ON THE MESONET SINCE APRIL 1ST.

WE CAN SEE OUT IN THE PANHANDLE, THEY'VE HAD UP TO 152 HOURS AT OR BELOW 32 DEGREES.

THAT DECREASES TO JUST A FEW HOURS ACROSS EAST CENTRAL OKLAHOMA.

WE TAKE A LOOK AT LAST YEAR'S MAP.

THIS COVERS THE ENTIRE SPRING.

BASICALLY WE'VE HAD MORE HOURS BELOW FREEZING JUST IN APRIL THIS YEAR THAN WE HAD ALL OF LAST SPRING, SO QUITE A DIFFERENT YEAR THAT WE'VE HAD THIS YEAR THAN LAST YEAR.

THAT'S IT FOR THIS TIME.

WE'LL SEE YOU NEXT TIME ON THE MESONET WEATHER REPORT.

 

DRY LOT CATTLE

>> DAVE LOHMAN, OUR EXTENSION BEEF CATTLE SPECIALIST, JOINS US NOW.

DAVE, WE'VE SEEN SOME RAIN AROUND THE STATE, BUT PRODUCERS IN WESTERN OKLAHOMA STILL REALLY FEELING THE EFFECTS OF THE DROUGHT.

HOW ARE THEY COPING, AND WHAT ARE YOU HEARING FROM THEM?

>> WELL, I THINK A LOT OF THEM ARE STILL TRYING TO HOLD ON TO AT LEAST A CORE GROUP OF COWS, WHETHER THEY BE COMMERCIAL OR SEED-STOCK OPERATION, AND STRUGGLING TO FIND RESOURCE -- I THINK A LOT OF THEM HAVING TO CONCENTRATE THEIR COWS AROUND THE WATER RESOURCE, AND THAT'S A PARTICULAR STRUGGLE FOR MANY.

>> AND YOU'VE GOTTEN SOME CALLS ON DRY-LOT FEEDING.

WHAT KIND OF ADVICE ARE YOU GIVING PRODUCERS IF THEY'RE CONSIDERING THAT?

>> DRY-LOT FEEDING WOULD BE A WAY TO GET THROUGH A DIFFICULT PERIOD.

IT WOULD ALSO BE A WAY TO DELAY TURNOUT ON SOME OF THEIR PASTURES, EVEN IN THE CENTRAL AND EASTERN PART OF THE STATE, AS OUR AGRONOMISTS AND RAIN SPECIALISTS TELL US THAT MIGHT BE GOOD IN THE LONG TERM FOR OUR FORAGES THIS YEAR, THAT IS, TO DELAY TURNOUT.

BUT BASICALLY ALL WE'RE GOING TO DO IS PUT THE COWS IN A DRY-LOT AREA, OR A SACRIFICE PASTURE, AND FEED CONCENTRATE INSTEAD OF FEED HAY, OR LET THEM GRAZE.

>> WHAT'S THE BEST WAY TO KIND  OF SET THAT UP, AND WHAT KIND OF THINGS DO YOU FEED THEM?

>> WELL, YOU KNOW, THE NICE THING ABOUT FEEDING CONCENTRATE IS IT DOESN'T TAKE HAY, OR VERY MUCH HAY.

A LOT OF PEOPLE ARE OUT OF HAY, AND IT'S VERY EXPENSIVE ANYWAY.

SO A VERY SIMPLE PROGRAM FOR, LET'S SAY, A COW IN THE MIDDLE STAGE OF GESTATION, 1200-POUND BEEF COW WOULD BE SOMETHING LIKE SIX POUNDS OF, LET'S JUST SAY, PRAIRIE HAY, FOUR POUNDS OF DRY DISTILLER GRAINS, AND FOUR POUNDS OF CRACKED CORN.

AND THEN YOU WOULD HAVE TO INCLUDE A MINERAL SUPPLEMENT WITH THAT THAT'S HIGH IN CALCIUM, BUT THOSE ARE THE MAJOR COMPONENTS.

THAT WOULD COST ON TODAY'S MARKET SOMEWHERE AROUND $1.20 A DAY.

TO DO THAT WITH HAY, IF YOU HAD TO GO PURCHASE HAY AND FEED THOSE COWS AND A LITTLE BIT OF HIGH-PROTEIN SUPPLEMENT, IT WOULD COST ABOUT $1.40.

YOU MIGHT SAVE A LITTLE BIT BECAUSE YOU'RE USING CONCENTRATE RATHER THAN PURCHASING HAY, YOU'RE NOT GOING TO SAVE A LOT, BUT IT WOULD CERTAINLY BE A WAY TO HELP PEOPLE EXTEND THE TIME PERIOD WHEN THOSE CATTLE ARE OFF OF THEIR PASTURES.

>> IS EARLY WEANING ALSO AN OPTION FOR PRODUCERS WANTING TO HANG ON TO SOME OF THEIR HERD?

>> THAT WOULD BE ANOTHER MANAGEMENT STRATEGY THEY COULD IMPLEMENT.

IT'S KIND OF OUT IN LEFT FIELD, BUT -- BECAUSE IT REQUIRES QUITE A BIT OF MANAGEMENT AND LABOR.

AT OSU SEVERAL YEARS AGO THERE WERE SOME EXPERIMENTS DONE WHERE CALVES WERE WARNED AT 45 TO 60 DAYS OF AGE, SO THEY'RE PRETTY YOUNG AND SMALL, BUT YOU CAN PULL THEM OFF THE COW, PUT THEM IN A DRY LOT, AND FEED A REALLY HIGH-QUALITY CONCENTRATE DIET TO THOSE LITTLE CALVES, AND BELIEVE IT OR NOT, THEY CAN GET BY AND GROW AND THRIVE ON CONCENTRATE FEED WITHOUT MOTHER'S MILK, BUT IT HAS TO BE A VERY SPECIFICALLY FORMULATED DIET.

I JUST ENCOURAGE PEOPLE IF THEY WANT TO CONSIDER THAT, TO CONTACT A NUTRITIONIST OR AN EXTENSION EDUCATOR TO HELP THEM WITH THAT.

BUT THE NICE THING ABOUT THAT, LYNDALL, IS THAT IT REDUCES THE NUTRIENT REQUIREMENTS OF THE COW BY 20%, BASICALLY IT REDUCES THEIR GRAZING PRESSURE BY 20%, OR YOU COULD GO AHEAD AND MARKET SOME OF THE OLDER COWS, AND KEEP THOSE CALVES IN THE DRY LOT FOR 45 TO 60 DAYS, AND THEN TURN THEM OUT LATER IN THE SUMMER WHEN THEY'RE BIG ENOUGH TO UTILIZE GRASS, AND, COME THIS FALL, YOU STILL HAVE YOUR ENTIRE CALF CROP TO SELL.

>> COUPLE OF TIPS FOR CONTINUING TO MANAGE THE CATTLE DURING THE DROUGHT.

FOR MORE TIPS AND A FACT SHEET ON THIS TOPIC, YOU CAN JUST GO TO OUR WEBSITE, SUNUP.OKSTATE.EDU.

 

SHOP STOP

>> HI, WELCOME TO SHOP STOP.

TODAY WE WANT TO TALK ABOUT A LITTLE TIP ABOUT KEEPING YOUR AIR HOSE FROM GETTING TANGLED.

>> HERE'S A REAL SIMPLE SOLUTION.

JUST A FIVE-GALLON OIL BUCKET.

AND THEN THROW YOUR AIR HOSE IN THE MIDDLE OF IT.

>> YOU CAN TAKE IT AND KNOCK A HOLE IN THE BOTTOM OF THE BUCKET, AND RUN YOUR MALE END OUT HERE SO YOU CAN PULL IT OUT AND HOOK TO YOUR COMPRESSOR, AND THE REST OF IT STAYS COILED AND EASY TO MANAGE.

>> ONCE YOU STAR PULLING ON IT, IT COMES RIGHT OUT, AND IT WON'T TANGLE UP.

IF YOU CURL IT UP NICE AND NEAT WHEN YOU GO BACK IN WITH IT, IT WILL EXTRACT NICE AND EASY, TOO.

>> IF YOU'RE TAKING THAT AIR HOSE TO A SHOP ON YOUR SERVICE TRUCK OR WHATEVER IT MAY BE, TO A JOB SITE WITH A REMOTE COMPRESSOR, IT'S ALL SELF-CONTAINED, EASY TO GRAB AND GO.

>> I GENERALLY IN MY SHOP DON'T HAVE ONE OF THESE, SO WHEN I DRAG MY AIR HOSE, I TRY TO COLLECT EVERYTHING IN MY SHOP AS I'M GOING OUT THE DOOR WITH MY AIR HOSE.

THIS IS A GOOD TIP TO KEEP THAT ORGANIZED.

>> THAT'S IT THIS WEEK FOR SHOP STOP.

WE'LL SEE YOU NEXT WEEK.

 

AG TECH CLASS

>> THIS TIME OF YEAR, A LOT OF AGRICULTURAL STUDENTS HAVE THEIR SIGHTS SET ON GRADUATION, AND WITHOUT QUESTION THE NEXT PHASE OF THEIR LIFE WILL INCLUDE TECHNOLOGY.

SUNUP INTERN SAMANTHA SMITH PICKS UP THE STORY FROM THERE.

>> KAITLYN NELSON IS A SENIOR IN AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS.

>> I THINK HAVING EVEN A SLIGHT UNDERSTANDING OF THE TECHNOLOGIES THAT ARE OUT THERE IS GOING TO HELP ALL OF US IN THIS CLASS.

>> THE CLASS IS CALLED "PRECISION AGRICULTURE" AND BRIAN ARNALL IS THE TEACHER.

>> THIS IS A VERY DIVERSE GROUP.

WE HAVE HORTICULTURE, PLANT SOIL SCIENCE, AG BIZ, AG EDUCATION, ANIMAL SCIENCE, AG COMMUNICATION, AG ENGINEERS, SO THEY'RE ALL GOING OUT IN DIFFERENT REALMS, DIFFERENT WORLDS.

WE TRY TO COVER A LOT OF THE RELEVANT PRECISION AG TECHNOLOGIES, CAPABILITIES THAT ARE OUT THERE, FROM YIELD MONITORS TO VARIABLE-RATE APPLICATION, SENSORS, AND EVEN, AS YOU SEE IN THE BACKGROUND, SOCIAL MEDIA, AND THE INTERNET.

PEOPLE AROUND THE WORLD, GROUPS AROUND THE WORLD ARE USING MORE AND MORE OF THESE TECHNOLOGIES EVERY DAY.

IT'S NOT JUST IN THE MACHINE.

IT'S HANDHELD UNITS.

IT'S APPLICATIONS ON THEIR iPADS, iPHONES THAT THEY HAVE TO ENTER DATA INTO.

ALMOST ALL OF OUR GRADUATES ARE COMING OUT NEEDING TO HAVE AT LEAST SOME BASE KNOWLEDGE OF TECHNOLOGIES.

>> AS WE ALL KNOW WITH TECHNOLOGY, CHANGE IS A DRIVING FORCE, BUT WITH RAPID CHANGE COMES JOB GROWTH.

>> WE HAVE TECHNOLOGY CHANGING DURING THE SEMESTER.

I MAY PRESENT SOMETHING IN THE FIRST SEMESTER.

BY THE END OF IT, IT'S ALREADY OUTDATED, ANTIQUATED.

IT'S SUCH A RAPID CHANGING ENVIRONMENT, YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT'S GOING TO COME NEXT.

>> PRECISION AGRICULTURE DOESN'T HAVE ENOUGH PEOPLE WHO CAN KEEP UP WITH THE TECHNOLOGY.

THERE'S SO MANY JOBS THAT ARE OPEN, CURRENTLY.

>> PEOPLE GO TO WORK WITH MONSANTO, PIONEER, SYNGENTA.

SOME GO AS AGRONOMISTS, MAY WORK AS A CROP CONSULTANT.

MANY OF THE ENGINEERS MAY GO TO WORK FOR COMPANIES BUILDING MACHINERY.

THE GROUP WILL SPLIT INTO MANY DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS.

>> TO EXPERIENCE JUST ONE OF THOSE DIRECTIONS THEY COULD TAKE, THE CLASS TOOK A TRIP TO SST, A PRECISION SOFTWARE COMPANY LOCATED IN STILLWATER.

>> PRIMARILY THE FOCUS IS FOR THEM TO BETTER LEARN WHAT WE ARE HERE AT SST AND FOR US TO REACH OUT TO THEM TO LET THEM KNOW THAT WE CAN BE A RESOURCE FOR THEM AFTER GRADUATION AND WHILE THEY'RE IN SCHOOL.

>> BASICALLY, WE JUST WANT TO SHOW THE STUDENTS OUR INTEREST IN PRECISION AG, AND MAYBE GET THEM MORE INTERESTED IN WHAT WE'RE DOING.

WHEN THEY GRADUATE OSU AND GO OUT INTO THE REAL WORLD, THEY'LL BE ABLE TO TAKE OUR THINKING OF WHAT'S GOING ON HERE AND MAYBE HELP APPLY THAT OUT TO THE REAL WORLD.

>> THEIR MAPPING IS STATE-OF-THE-ART.

THEY'RE THE ONLY COMPANY IN THE WORLD THAT DOES IT, AND THEY ARE REALLY GOOD AT IT, AND GOING THERE AND SEEING THAT AND HAVING A CHANCE TO WORK ON THEIR PROGRAMS WAS A ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME OPPORTUNITY.

>> AN OPPORTUNITY TO BUILD TODAY'S LEADERS FOR TOMORROW'S AGRICULTURE.

FOR SUNUP, I'M SAMANTHA SMITH.

>> THAT DOES IT FOR US THIS WEEK.

REMEMBER, YOU CAN SEE US ANYTIME ON OUR WEBSITE, SUNUP.OKSTATE.EDU.

YOU CAN ALSO FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, YOUTUBE, AND TWITTER.

I'M LYNDALL STOUT.

HAVE A GREAT WEEK, EVERYONE, AND WE'LL SEE YOU NEXT TIME AT SUNUP.

(CAPTIONING PROVIDED BY CAPTION SOLUTIONS, LLC WWW.CAPTIONSOLUTIONS.COM)

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